From Walt Thyng (ERCITS)
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From Walt Thyng

From: Walt Thyng, 20 Sleepy Hollow Rd., Wolfeboro, N. H. 03894
Email: docwt@worldpath.net

Photo #1: Midwest Mustang 60. 65-inch span, area 727 sq.in.. Design weight 6 1 /2 - 7 lb.; electric flying weight 7 1/2 lb. Power system: Maxcim MaxNeo 13Y; MEG 3.3 3/1 gearbox; 1 5/8 Zinger; twenty 2000mah cells; Maxcim ESC. Robart pneumatic retracts; Servos 2 Airtronics 102 and 2 8431s; Functions rudder, elevator, full span flaperons. Flight times 4 to 8 minutes depending on throttle use.
     This was an easy conversion, and if I had gone all out Iím sure I could have brought it in at the 6 1/2 lbs. which is the wet power weight. Flight speed appeared to be close to scale. Performance was excellent. Take-offs in 40 feet from grass (with 5 degrees of flaperon). Flaperons allowed very slow (but steep) approaches. Large round loops from level flight. Scale rolls, gentle stalls. Stalls, however, were sharp (note: I reduced the dihedral to 4 degrees, less than recommended).
     Finish (Ultracote) was supposed to be Bob Hooverís first P-51. Later I found out the color scheme was black and yellow. Sadly this aircraft was lost when an aileron servo failed as I dropped full flaps on final.

Photo #2: Battery access hatch on the P-51.

Photo #3: My Bud Nosen 1/4 scale Citabria finished to resemble a local Decathlon. Span 9-feet, Area 1,550 sq.in.; Electric Flying weight 17 lb. Power system: Astro 60G on 32 1 700s, AF 204D Esc; 5 Airtronics 102 servos. Covering: Ultracote.
     Flying is proto-typical. A slight dive for loops, barrel-like rolls. Take-offs are about 60 feet off grass. Landings are an absolute dream. Rock solid, slow and fully controllable. A gentle flying Sunday fun bird.
     It would be hard to reduce the weight on this kit. It is largely stick built. Some birch ply can be replaced and ribs could be relieved. Builders need to be experienced as the plans are minimal and there is no help from the current manufacturer.

Photo #4: Nosen Citabria: motor installation; ESC mounting and battery pack tray (removable)

Photo #5: Ready for takeoff.

Photo #6: Me and Big bird.

Photo #7: Cowl access to Battery pack.

     Hereís the Platt Waco YMF-3. Top wing 60 in., bottom 56 in, Area: 960 sq.in. Weight 9 lb. 14 oz. with Astro 40G, 9 lb. 6 oz. with MaxNeo and MEG gearbox. Original power Astro 40G (straight cut) on 20 2000 mAh cells; changed to MaxNeo 13Y with MEC 3.3 3/1 gears on 20 2000 mAh cells, prop: Zinger 1 5/8. covering: Ultracote (do I like it? YES!).
     I acquired this kit in partially built and damaged condition from the shop of a deceased modeller. It was started in 1986 and finally flew in 2000! All the old Ambroid glue joints were still solid, and I have not experienced any failures after some dozen flights, including a couple of badly botched landings!
     As I stated in the rating article which you previously published, this is one great flying aircraft.

Photo #9: One VERY happy pilot after the first flight. NC number means: year 2000 first model by WT. (see story above for photo)

Photo #10: Nose on view showing PVC dummy engine.

Photo #11: Parts and completed dummy engine. Cylinders are made from PVC threaded couplings glued together and cut in half. Push rods are lollipop sticks. Cost per cylinder - $.89. Total weight of cowling and seven cylinders: 8 oz.

Photo #12: Shot of battery access hatch/cooling outlet. Air enters through cowl and flows through fuel tank pocket in firewall (where batteries are now located) and out.

Reprinted courtesy of "The Future is Electric" by Ken Myers

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This page created and maintained by Al MacDonald. Updated January 21, 2002.

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